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THE INDIAN MUTINY

1857

 

FORMER PUPILS OF THE HONOURABLE 

EAST INDIA COLLEGE

"OLD HAILEYBURY"

WHO DIED IN THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY

 

The following are abstracts taken from the book 

"MEMORIALS OF OLD HAILEYBURY COLLEGE".

The abstracts are taken verbatim. Thus the spellings are those used at the time the book was printed in 1894

THEIR RECORDS

 

GEORGE SACKVILLE BENSON

 

Haileybury 1847 - 1848

 

Returned from furlough when the Mutiny began & attached himself to Havelock’s force and died from wounds when entering Lucknow

*****

Captain WILLIAM STUART BEATSON

Haileybury 1842 - 1843

1st Bengal Light Cavalry

Killed at Cawnpore June 1857

*****

ADAM HENRY GEORGE BLOCK

Haileybury 1849 - 1850

Deputy Commissioner of Sultanpore in Oudh, the headquarters of the 15th Irregular Cavalry, commanded by Sam Fisher, one of the finest officers in the Service. On June 5th Block was warned of the approach of mutinous Sepoys from Jaunpore, who had declared to kill every European. Fisher & Block at once sent off the ladies and children under an escort to Allahabad, but refused to leave themselves. The next day they were basely murdered by some policemen, the troopers standing by.

*****

WILLIAM HENRY CAULFIELD

Haileybury 1853 - 1856

Ayoung assistant, who took his full share at Benares in the patrolling parties which kept order in the city and district. The hard work and exposure broke down his health and he died.

*****

GEORGE JACKSON CHRISTIAN

Haileybury 1842 - 1843

Commissioner of Seetapore in Oudh, which was garrisoned by two regiments of Oudh Infantry and the 41st Native Infantry. Christian from the first suspected the troops, but the officers had the blindest confidence in their men. In anticipation of an outbreak Christian fortified his house, in which he placed the women and children. On June 3rd the troops mutinied, murdered their Officers and European Officials, and then attacked Christian’s house, which they soon rendered untenable. He was forced to fly with his wife and child and they were all three pursued and murdered. In George Christian the Service lost one of its most distinguished members, and no higher praise can be given to his memory than to record the fact that he was held in the highest estimation by John and Henry Lawrence.

*****

WIGRAM CLIFFORD

Haileybury 1853 - 1854

Assistant Magistrate of Goorgaon. With Ford, the Magistrate, joined Harvey and Money from Agra and cooperated with them in keeping open communications throughout May. When the Bhurtpore troops with Harvey mutinied, Clifford escaped across Jumna to Bulundshahr. He was killed in action when attached to troops after the taking of Delhi.

*****

HENRY EDMUND COCKERELL

Haileybury 1850 - 1852

Joint Magistrate of Banda, and stationed at the outpost of Kirwee. He was repeatedly written to by Mayne the Magistrate, to come into Banda, he being the only Englishman at Kirwee. But he felt in honour bound tp remain at his post, to which he held fast until Mayne sent a small escort to conduct him to Banda. He the very reluctantly started though he saw that it was utterly useless to remain alone where he was. Before he could reach Banda, Mayne and his party had to fly for their lives, the Nawab’s men having broken out, and Cockerell only reached the gates of the Palace to be murdered by these very men. His pluck, and what he unselfishly considered his duty, cost him his life. Only four years in Service, he was a bright example of a brave young Englishman.

*****

CHARLES WATKIN CUNLIFFE

Haileybury 1850 - 1852

Deputy Commissioner of Baraech, a turbulent and unsettled district in Oudh. When the troops mutinied he and Lieutenant Longueville Clarke escaped to Nanpara, but were refused admittance there. They then tried to get to Lucknow, but were detected when crossing the Ghagra at Bahram Gat and shot down.

*****

BURKE ROBERT CUPPAGE

Haileybury 1848 - 1851

Joint Magistrate of Jaunpore. The only troops at this Station were a detachment of the Sikh regiment which had mutinied at Benares, and they, on hearing of the punishment that had been inflicted on their brethren, broke out into open mutiny, shot their Commandant, helped themselves to the Treasure and meeting Cuppage on his way to the jail, shot him down; and with their plunder marched to Lucknow.

*****

SIMON FRASER

Haileybury 1819 - 1821

Commissioner of Dehli. About 9 a.m. on Monday, May 11, information reached Fraser that four troops of Cavalry and two Regiments of Infantry, which had mutinied at Meerut, were crossing the Jumna bridge of boats, having plundered and burnt the toll - house. The Commissioner’s house and office were in Ludlow Castle, a short distance outside the Kashmir Gate. He determined to go into the city at once , and was on the point of starting when Le Bas, the Judge, and Hutchinson, the Magistrate, drove up, and after conferring the three drove in together. Fraser had the gate closed and was about to enter the Palace when a trooper of the 3rd Cavalry rode at him to cut him down. Fraser seized a musket from the guard and shot him. He then entered the Palace, had the main gate shut, and went up to the quarters of Captain Douglas, Commandant of the Palace Guard; who resided with his family above the Lahore Gate of the Palace. In this room were the Rev. Mr. Jennings, his daughter, Miss Clifford, Mrs. Douglas and her children. Captain Douglas, who had just been attacked by the King’s khasbardars, staggered in and fell insensible. On Fraser seeing the state of affairs and the lamentable condition of his assistant he left, and went downstairs unarmed. A mounted trooper of the 3rd Cavalry was outside, calling on the people to open the gate. The Commissioner upbraided him in severe terms, and was returning upstairs to procure arms when Khalidad Khan, an Afghan khasbarder of the King’s guard, coming up behind wounded him very severely on the head and face. Fraser fell and was then and there killed by the Afghan.

*****

ARTHUR GALLOWAY

Haileybury 1841 - 1842

assistant Magistrate at Dehli. On hearing of the disturbances in the city on the early morning of Monday, May 11, Galloway went to his post at thr Treasury, and only quitted it for a time to procure aid from the Main Guard at the Kashmir Gate, as the Sepoys of the Treasury Guard were almost in a state of mutiny, though up to that time they had not attacked him or broken into the strong room. The Officers at the gate, deserted by their men and many of them wounded, could give no assistance, and Galloway was repeatedly urged to remain and take his chance with them, as he could do no good by returning to the Treasury, and would certainly lose his life. He said he knew what the result would be, but it was his duty to stick to his post. He did so and stood on guard at the Treasury door, armed with a sword, one solitary Englishman among a mass of infuriated howling Sepoys, who soon overpowered and cut him down resisting to the last.

*****

HENRY GONNE

Haileybury 1849 - 1851

Deputy Commissioner at Mullapore in Oudh. This district soon caught the contagion of rebellion and anarchy, and Gonne with the rest of the officials were in a few days. After hoping against hope, were compelled to leave. Thet attempted to make their way down the Sarju by boat, but finding all the regular landing - places occupied by the rebels, they left their boat and made the best of their way to the Fort of Mathiara, belonging to the Raja of Dharawa. Thence the party attempted to reach Lucknow, but failed. They were not allowed to remain at Matharia, so made for the Nepaul Terai, but were attacked on the way and murdered, after undergoing terrible privations and suffering.

*****

DONALD GRANT

Haileybury 1850 - 1852

Assistant Magistrate at Humeerpore. Gallantly held to his post with Loyd, the Magistrate. Though urged by Mayne, the Magistrate of Banda, to retire to that Station whilst comparative order still prevailed, they refused to move. Had they gone to Banda they would have been saved, for no lives were lost at that Station, except that of Cockerell, who came from Kirwee after the others had been obliged to fly. On June 13 they had to try to make their escape, for the troops mutinied, murdered all the Christians they could find, and burned and plundered the Station. Crossing the Jumna they tried to get to Futtehpore at first, but finding that hopeless they returned and remained hidden in the reeds at the Junction of the Jumna and Betwa. Here they were for a time fed by loyal men in Humeerpore, but were at last discovered, brought back to the station and shot there. Very gallant and unselfish was their conduct.

*****

HERVEY HARRIS GREATHED

Haileybury 1834 - 1835

Commissioner of Meerut. He and his family had a very narrow escape with their lives on the night of May 10. Warned of the outbreak, he had taken his wife and some other English women who had sought safety with them to the roof of his house. But the insurgents set fire to the lower part of the building, plundered the rooms and then surrounded the place. With the flames raging beneath and the enemy in the crowds around their position was one of deadly peril, and they must have perished miserably but for a native servant who simulated intense sympathy for the rebels. He told them his master had escaped and offered to show them the spot where he was concealed, and so led them away from the house. Greathed and his companions descended into the garden just as the roof fell in with a tremendous crash. Greathed proceeded with the troops under Wilson to Dehli, and was present at the battles on the Hindan. He remained in camp throughout the siege and lived long enough to witness our troops enter the city, but fell a victim to cholera on September 19, one day before the work was completed, and thus was lost to the Service a very meritorious Officer.

*****

CHARLES GEORGE HILLERSDON

Haileybury 1838 - 1840

Collector of Cawnpore. This is not the place to record the events of the terribly anxious times passed by the Christians of Cawnpore previous to entering the so - called intrenchments, nowhere higher than three feet, which they did as a forlorn hope; nor the terrible suffering they there underwent; nor the cruel treachery of which the survivors were victims, trusting to the promised protection and safeguard of the accursed Nana. Suffice it to say the brave and patient Hillersdon soon fell, killed by a round shot in the presence of his wife, she herself soon following him.

*****

JOHN ROSS HUTCHINSON

Haileybury 1840 - 1841

Magistrate of Dehli. On hearing of the arrival of the mutineers from Meerut on the morning of May 11, Hutchinson drove to the Commissioner’s house and after conferring with him left for the Dehli gate in order to have it closed. Some men of the 3rd Cavalry, with swords drawn, were hastening to the Palace. Hutchinson had no arms and when he saw them turned his buggy and tried to escape, but the Sowars surrounded it and cut at him. Wounded and bleeding he jumped from the buggy and ran into the house of Ram Ji Das, from which the mutineers dragged him and put him to death.

*****

COLVILLE COVERLY JACKSON

On his return from furlough was re- posted to Oudh. Accompanied Sir Colin campbell and was present at the recapture of Lucknow, but his leg was broken by a fall from his horse, and he died from the injury before he could assume his duties.

*****

Sir MOUNTSTEUART GOODRICHE JACKSON

Haileybury 1854 - 1855

Assistant Commissioner of Seetapore. With his sister and some others escaped from the massacre of Seetapore, only to fall victims to the cruelty of the rebels later on. They remained concealed in the jungles near the Fort of the Mitowlee Raja, who would not receive them; and after being in hiding for several weeks, undergoing the greatest hardships and privations, under which several of the party succumbed, the survivors were taken prisoner to Lucknow, where they were cruelly murdered.

*****

ARTHUR JENKINS

Haileybury 1850 - 1852

Assistant Commissioner at Poorwa in Oudh. Escorted the non - combatants to Cawnpore, and perished there with the rest.

*****

CHARLES JOHN JENKINS

Haileybury 1849 - 1851

When the troops mutinied at Shahjehanpore, the officers were either shot down on the spot or murdered when attempting to escape into Oudh. Jenkins perished among the latter at Mohumdee.

*****

ALEXANDER JOHNSTON

Haileybury 1845 - 1847

Was officiating Magistrate of Meerut. The troops at Meerut remaining inactive after the outbreak of May 10, the district naturally and rapidly became disorganized. On May 24 Johnston obtained the assistance of a small party of Carabineers to proceed against some of the most refractory of the villages in the neighbourhood, and the burning of the village of Iktiarpore was the first hint given to the people that there were some British soldiers left. On the return of this expedition Johnston was thrown from his horse and died in a few days from the effects of the fall. And thus was lost to the Service a gallant and rising young officer

*****

ROBERT NISBET LOWIS

Haileybury 1849 - 1851

Joint Magistrate of Farruckabad, close to the Cantonment of Futtehgurh. On hearing of the approach of the mutineers from Bareilly and Shahjehanpore, the non - combatants set off in boats down the Ganges. But hearing many contradictory reports as to the attitude of the villagers on the banks, the party divided next day. Some went up the Ramganga to Dharmpore, whence most of them returned to Futtehgurh. This they gallantly defended, but were eventually obliged to evacuate it and the survivors were brutally mudered. The others tried to escape down thw Ganges to Cawnpore and Lowis went with them. He lost his life on the way; the others were victims of the Nana at Bithoor.

*****

THOMAS KIRKHAM LOYD

Haileybury 1831 - 1832

Magistrate of Humeerpore. The only troops at Humeerpore were the Treasury Guard of the 56th native Infantry, under a Subhdar, who were known to be disaffected. Loyd therefore called on two neighbouring Rajas, on whose loyalty he could rely, to furnish him with a few men; and up to June 13th a semblance of order was maintained. But on that date the Sepoys broke out, the levies joined them, and the work of murder, arson and plunder commenced. The Christian clerks and their fasmilies were the first victims. Loyd, grant, and two visitors ( refugees from Jalaun), finding that their horses had been seized, fled across the Jumna hoping to escape to Cawnpore or Futehpore. The others went on, and one did eventually reach Havelock’s camp, but Loyd and Grant returned and lay hid at the junction of the Jumna and Betwa. For a few days they were fed by faithful men in Humeerpore, but eventually they were betrayed by a goatherd and brought into the station, where they were shot by the mutineers.

Loyd and his party might have escaped to Banda and were pressed to do so by Mayne, the Magistrate there, but they would not leave their posts, and gave up their lives sooner than do so. It is touching to record Loyd’s unshaken belief in his countrymen. His last words, as he stood awaiting his death, are said to have been, "Have the English not come yet?"

*****

JOHN ROBERT MACKILLOP

Haileybury 1844 - 1846

Joint Magistrate of Cawnpore; a brave, unselfish man. When the English entered what were called the inrenchments, which were hastily thrown up earthworks, affording little or no shelter to the besieged, Mackillop took upon himself to draw water for his comrades from a well exposed to the full fire of the rebels. He did not long carry on this dangerous duty, but soon fell a victim to his unselfish bravery, pierced by the bullets of the enemy. No man ever yielded his life better than "Jack" Mackillop.

*****

JOHN PEACH MACWHIRTER

Haileybury 1839 - 1840

Magistrate of Paneepat in the Dehli Division, always a very turbulent one and difficult to manage. It, of course, very soon became completely disorganized, and the residents had to leave. Macwhirter tried to make his way to Dehli, but lost his life on the road, whether drowned crossing the canal or murdered by villagers has never been ascertained.

*****

CHARLES JAMES MANSON

Haileybury 1841 - 1843

Political Agent in the Southern Maratha country. Hearing while at Kundwar of a rising at Gudduck, in which the Chief of Nurgoond was actively concerned, he at once started for Nurgoond, hoping by his personal influence to settle matters. He reached Ramdroog, 25 miles from Nurgroond, on the evening of May 28th, when the news the Chief had joined the rebels was confirmed, and he was urged not to proceed with his insufficient escort. But on he went, and during the night was attacked by the rebels; and he and his escort, consisting of sixteen troopers, were cut up, one man alone escaping and he severely wounded. Manson’s death was much deplored, as he was most popular and an officer of no ordinary merit. The Chief was subsequently captured and brought to justice.

*****

WILLIAM RICHARD MOORE

Haileybury 1850 - 1851

Joint Magistrate at Mirzapore. In June was sent to Gopeeganji in charge of the northern portion of the district. There this promising young officer met his death at the hands of the rebel Rajputs of Pali, whose leader he had arrested.

*****

MANATON COLLINGWOOD OMMANEY

Haileybury 1829 - 1831

Judicial Commissioner of Oudh. Was one of the Provisional Council at Lucknow during Sir Henry Lawrence’s serious illness in June. Ommaney fell a victim early in the siege, being wounded on July 4 and dying from the effects very shortly afterwards, thus gallantly closing a career of meritorious service.

*****

GEORGE DAVY RAIKES

Haileybury 1833 - 1835

Judge of Bareilly. On hearing of the outbreak at Meerut the neighbourhood became very unsettled, and the authorities soon became aware that the troops at Bareilly were only waiting their opportunity to break out. The ladies and children were sent off to Nynee Tal. On May 31st the Infantry and Artillery mutinied, several of the officers were shot by their men and others murdered by the villagers when trying to escape to the hills. Raikes instead of proceeding with the rest of the fugitives, for all the officials had to leave, took refuge with a ahomedan Sub - Judge. But the house was very soon attacked by the ruffians from the city, who basely murdered Raikes and Mr. Birch, who was with him.

*****

MORDAUNT RICKETTS.

Haileybury 1843 - 1845

Magistrate of Shahjehanpore. The 28th Native Infantry stationed at Shahjehanpore rose on the morning of Sunday, May 31, when most of the Civil and Military European residents were in church. A party of Sepoys, armed with swords, entered while the service was going on and cut down Ricketts and others. The Assistant Magistrate, Jenkins, and several Officers and ladies who managed to escape from the church were immediately fired on from the neighbouring Sepoy lines, but the majority got away in buggies and on horseback, only to be eventually massacred in Oudh. Syud Amjad Ali, Tahsildar, who on hearing the firing had hastened to the spot, found Ricketts’s body in the church. The sword cuts on head and neck were so terribly severe that death must have been immediate. The bodies were treated with all respect and carefully buried by the Syud.

*****

DAVID ROBERTSON

Haileybury 1827 - 1829

Judge of Bareilly from 1829 till 1857. Bareilly was the headquarters of the Rohilcund Division. The station, though rumours of approaching evil were rife, remained quiet till May 31, the women and children being sent off in the interval to Nynee Tal. On that date the Native Infantry and Artillery broke out, murdering several of their Officers, and the station was given up to plunder and arson. Robertson declined to leave for the Hills with the rest of the Officials and took refuge with a friendly native , along with the Doctor and the Deputy Collector. But the towns- people attacked the house and murdered Robertson and his companions.

*****

ARTHUR CHESTER SMITH

Haileybury 1852 - 1854

Assistant Magistrate at Shahjehanpore. This station was garrisoned by the 28th Native Infantry, which broke out on Sunday, May 31, while the residents were in church, where most of them were cruelly murdered. Some few escaped to Mohumdee, only to fall victims a few days later on to the cruelty and treachery of the mutineers. Smith tried to escape through the town, and concealed himself for a time in the Kotwali, but was discovered and murdered there.

*****

JAMES GRANT THOMASON

Haileybury 1849 - 1850

Deputy Commissioner of Mohumdee in Oudh. The position of Mohumdee, close to the frontier of Rohilcund and but a short distance from Shahjehanpore, rendered it very sensitive to the insurrectionary movement. It was garrisoned by a detachment of the 9th Oudh Infantry and a few police troopers. Troubles commenced at Shahjehanpore and the officials with ladies and children made the best of their way to Mohumdee. Thomason was unable to obtain carriage for them and applied for help to Christian at Seetapore. Christian, by great exertion, managed to supply this and forwarded it under an escort of Oudh Irregulars. The English left Mohumdee guarded by this party. They proceeded safely as far as Aurungabad, when the escort turned on them and butchered them in cold blood, only one man, Captain Orr, escaping. The ladies, eight in number, behaved splendidly, joining in prayer and calmly waiting their fate. The fugitives from Shahjehanpore and Mohumdee formed a large party, comprising two civilians ( Thomason and Jenkins), three Captains, six Lieutenants, three ensigns, one sergeant, one Bandmaster with eight ladies and four children.

*****

HENRY BENSLEY THORNHILL

Haileybury 1844 - 1845

Assistant Commissioner of Seetapore in Oudh. This station was garrisoned by the 41st Native Infantry, a regiment which gained an unenviable notoriety in the Mutiny. The residents held out as long as possible, but had to leave after terrible anxieties. They were hotly pursued, and men women and children ruthlessly shot down by the mutineers. tHornhill and his wife perished amongst them.

*****

JOHN BENSLEY THORNHILL

Haileybury 1850 - 1852

Deputy Commissioner in Oudh. Was one of the Lucknow garrison, having escaped from his own district. On the approach of Havelock’s relieving force Thornhill volunteered to go out and guide the troops through the city. In the performance of this most important service he was mortally wounded and died after he had been carried to the Residency.

*****

ROBERT BENSLEY THORNHILL

Haileybury 1835 - 1836

Judge of Farruckabad, a station eighty miles up the Ganges from Cawnpore. It was garrisoned by the 10th Native Infantry, which did not commit any overt act of mutiny till June 3, when some of the Oudh Irregulars entered the station and the 10th fraternized with them. A few days later the 41st Native Infantry, which had mutinied and committed many murders at Seetapore, arrived and the city rose, thus rtendering the place untenable. Some of the residents had previously gone down the river in boats, the rest took the fort, which they gallantly defended to the last. Thornhill was one of the fugitives in the boats, many of whom were killed on the voyage. The rest only reached Bithoor to swell the terrible slaughter carried out there and at Cawnpore by the orders of the Nana.

*****

ROBERT TUDOR TUCKER

Haileybury 1833 - 1835

Judge of Futtehpore. On June 9 the storm burst at this Station, halfway between Allahabad and Cawnpore. The mob plundered the Treasury, let loose the prisoners and destroyed the Government offices, and the officials had to escape as best they could. But Tucker refused to stir. He took up his post on the roof of the Magistrate’s office and there held the rebels at bay till he was shot down, not before several had fallen to his rifle. Not one member of the Service behaved more gallantly than Robert Tucker, one brave Englishman alone and unsupported, not hesitating to face an infuriated mob of ruffians and sacrificing the life which he might well have saved to a noble, if exaggerated , sense of duty. So much had he endeared himself to all that after his death two Hindus stood out and cursed his murderers in public, for which honest and brave speech they lost their lives.

*****

Captain EDMUND CHARLES VIBART

Haileybury 1842

2nd Bengal Light Cavalry

Killed at Cawnpore 27 June 1857.

*****

WILLIAM CHRISTIAN WATSON

Haileybury 1842 - 1843

Magistrate of Allygarh. At the time of the outbreak the force present at Allygarh consisted of 300 men of the 9th Native Infantry. Watson, who, though hard pressed himself, sent half a company of the 9th Native Infantry to assist the Magistrate of Bulundshahr, held his own very difficult circumstances till May 20th when the regiment mutinied , burned the station and carried 3 lacs of treasure to Dehli. Watson and the Officers ( the ladies and children having previously been sent to Agra) retired on Hatras, a town on the road to Agra, where they remained till May 26, when they were relieved by a body of Volunteers under Greathed of the Engineers and escorted back to Allygarh. Watson’s position was one of the greatest danger, owing to the constant passing of mutinous reiments to Dehli. He, however, maintained, at all events a semblance of authority till July 2, when driven out by overwhelming numbers, he and his party retired to the fort at Agra, where he shortly afterwards died of cholera.

*****

JOHN WEDDERBURN

Haileybury 1842 - 1843

Magistrate of Hissar. When the Huriana Infantry and the detachment of the 4th Irregular Cavalry stationed at Hansi determined to mutiny, they sent five Sowars to their comrades at Hissar with instructions to rise, murder the Europeans and seize the treasure. These men rode up to the Fort on arrival and called on the Guard to open the gates, as the Russian Army had arrived. All the European officials and residents were inside the Fort, as well as the Treasury Guard of Sepoys. When the latter heard of the events at Hansi they sounded the alarm, and Lieutenant Barwell on going to the spot was shot down. Wedderburn, while holding office, was shot in his chair by one of the Treasury Guard Sepoys, who came behind him.

*****

 

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THE HONOURABLE EAST INDIA COLLEGE - OLD HAILEYBURY

THE CAMPAIGNS & WARS 1806 - 1857

Copyright Haileybury College

26 March 2003